Your bedroom entitlement

Calculating your bedroom entitlement

The government's formula for the number of bedrooms you need looks at the number of adults and children who live with you as members of your household.

Single people and couples

Single people and couples are entitled to one bedroom.

By couple we mean a man and a woman who are married or living together as if they are married, or two people of the same sex who are Civil Partners or who are living together as if they were Civil Partners.

Children

The number of bedrooms allowed for children depends on how old they are and their sex. The rules assume that:

  • two children aged 0-9 can share a bedroom whatever their sex
  • children aged 10-15 can share a bedroom with a child of the same sex

Children aged 16-19

Children aged 16-19 are allowed a bedroom of their own.

Other adults and joint tenants

If your household includes other adults (such as a grown-up child or a parent) then they should be included in this category and are allowed a bedroom of their own (except in Universal Credit). If any of the other adults who live with you are in a couple then they count as one and are allowed one bedroom.

If you have a tenancy agreement where you and one or more other people are jointly liable for paying the rent then you are a joint tenant. You should include any joint tenants in this category, remembering that if any of them are in a couple then they count as one and are entitled to one bedroom.

When entering the number of adults who live with you do not include yourself or your partner.

Carer who stays overnight

If you have a carer who stays overnight then you could qualify for an extra room. For more information see overnight carer.
 

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