Pregnancy overview

Pregnancy overview

How being pregnant may affect your Universal Credit and work-related requirements

If you are pregnant you must report this by contacting Universal Credit when your pregnancy reaches 20 weeks. Either you or your partner can do this if you are both part of the same Universal Credit claim.

Confirming the pregnancy

You must provide evidence of the pregnancy and the due date by providing a MATB1 from your GP, hospital or midwife. You can get a MATB1 when you are 20 weeks pregnant so you shouldn't report it before then.

However, if you have a health condition at any point in your pregnancy, you will need to tell Universal Credit.

You may be able to get Healthy Start Vouchers before you have obtained a MATB1. These vouchers will not affect your Universal Credit. Your midwife or health visitor will explain how you can claim them.

Work-related requirements

If you provide a MATB1 you will be in the no work-related requirements group for the 11 weeks up to your due date, and 15 weeks afterwards.

If you are a lone parent, or the nominated responsible carer in a couple, you will stay in the no work-related requirements group until your child's first birthday.

If you develop a health condition related to your pregnancy, you might in certain circumstances be treated as having limited capability for work and work-related activity.

Reporting when the child is born

You must phone Universal Credit to report the birth of your child. You will be contacted if you have not reported the birth within 6 weeks of your due date.

A change in your pregnancy

You must phone Universal Credit to report any changes in your pregnancy, for example:

  • the development of a health condition related to a pregnancy
  • premature birth
  • stillbirth
  • miscarriage
  • termination of pregnancy
  • changes to work and earnings due to pregnancy (for example, a reduction in your working hours)

This is not a complete list.

All changes in your pregnancy must be reported within 1 month.

Changes to your work and earnings

If your hours reduce, your Claimant commitment will be reviewed. If you are more than 11 weeks from your due date, the work-related requirements in your Claimant commitment will not be affected by your pregnancy.

Why is it asked?

So that you are placed in the correct conditionality group during and after your pregnancy.

What you should do if you experience a stillbirth, miscarriage or termination of pregnancy and how your Universal Credit may be affected

If you have already provided a MATB1 and have a stillbirth, miscarriage or termination of pregnancy you will need to tell Universal Credit. This is because it may effect your work related requirements.

If you think you're unfit for work resulting from stillbirth, miscarriage or termination of pregnancy then you should contact Universal Credit.

Stillbirth

If you have a stillbirth you will be in the no work-related requirements group for 15 weeks following the date of birth. You will need to provide a stillbirth certificate along with your name, address and National Insurance number.

After 15 weeks your Claimant Commitment may need to be reviewed with your Adviser.

Miscarriage

If you have a miscarriage your Claimant Commitment may need to be reviewed with your Adviser. If you feel your ability to work or look for work is affected while recovering, you must get a fit note from your GP or healthcare specialist.

Termination of pregnancy

If you have, or plan to have, a termination your Claimant Commitment may need to be reviewed with your Adviser. If you feel your ability to work or look for work is affected while recovering, you must get a fit note from your GP or healthcare specialist.

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